Recent Posts

Mold Basics

4/24/2018 (Permalink)

Molds are part of the natural environment. Molds are fungi that can be found anywhere - inside or outside - throughout the year. 

Outdoors, molds play an important role in nature by breaking down organic matter such as toppled trees, fallen leaves, and dead animals. We would not have food and medicines, like cheese and penicillin, without mold. 

Indoors, mold growth should be avoided. Problems arise when mold starts eating away at materials, affecting the look, smell, and possibly, with the respect to wood-framed buildings, affecting the structural integrity of the buildings.

Molds can grow on virtually any substance, as long as moisture or water, oxygen, and an organic source are present. Molds reproduce by creating tiny spores that usually cannot be seen without magnification. Mold spores continually float through the indoor and outdoor air. 

Molds are usually not a problem unless mold spores land on a damp spot and begin growing. They digest whatever they land on in order to survive. There are molds that grow on wood, paper, carpet, foods and insulation, while other molds feast on the everyday dust and dirt that gather in the moist regions of a building.

When excessive moisture or water accumulates indoors, mold growth often will occur, particularly if the moisture problem remains uncorrected. While it is impossible to eliminate all molds and mold spores, controlling moisture can control indoor mold growth. 

If you experience mold growth in your home or office SERVPRO is here to help. 

SERVPRO of Benicia/Maritnez/Se Vallejo                (925)372-7234

Campfire Safety

4/24/2018 (Permalink)

Campfire accidents send thousands of people to emergency rooms with burn injuries every year.

Safety Around The Fire

  • Before setting up a campfire, be sure it is permitted.
  • Keep campfires at least 25 feet away from anything that can burn.
  • Clear away dry leaves and sticks.
  • Avoid burning on windy days.
  • Watch children while fire is burning. 
  • Attend to the campfire at all times.
  • Keep a campfire small which is easier to control.
  • Never use gas or other flammable or combustible liquids.
  • Always have a hose, bucket of water, or shovel nearby to put out the fire.
  • If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll.
  • Treat burns right away. Cool the burn with cool water for 3 to 5 minutes. Cover with clean, dry cloth. get medical help if needed. 

Water Damage Safety Tips for Homeowners

2/16/2018 (Permalink)

Here are some precautions to take if you discover a water loss in your home until help arrives. 

  • Shut off water if possible
  • Block any furniture to prevent further damage
  • Remove and prop wet upholstery and cushions.
  • Remove excess water by mopping and blotting. Do NOT use your vacuum to remove water 
  • Wipe excess water form belongings.
  • Remove belongs and area rugs from the wet floor
  • DO NOT use electrical devices, keep away from light switches and sockets if water is leaking it easily can be within the electrical circuit.
  • Open doors and windows. 
  • If safe, use hvac system to aid in air flow
  • Call your local water damage specialist

SERVPRO of Benicia/Martinez/Southeast Vallejo is here to help. Give us a call at 925-372-7234

Preventing Water Losses in the Bathroom

2/7/2018 (Permalink)

Water loss occurs often in bathrooms. Here are some loss prevention and maintenance tips to help you avoid experiencing water damage. 

Sinks

  • Inspect plumbing beneath sinks every 6 months.
  • Looks for kinks in pipes. These can lead to leaks over time.
  • Locate water shut-off valve and inspect every 6 months to make sure it is working.

Toilets

  • Inspect the supply line every 6 months.
  • Ensure the connection to the valve is secure.
  • Operate the valve to make sure the water supply will shut off. 
  • Inspect the flushing mechanism inside the toilet. Replace assembly if you notice intermittent or constant tank refilling.

Shower Stalls

  • Inspect tile and grout, paying attention to loose or cracked tiles. Replace as needed.
  • Test shower pan to ensure it is holding water and not leaking out. 

If you do experience a water loss give us a call.  We can be reached at 925-372-7234          SERVPRO of Benicia/Martinez/Southeast Vallejo has professionals on call 24 hrs. to assist you!

Hotel & Motel Safety

1/3/2018 (Permalink)

Vacations and business travel make hotels and motels our home away from home. It is just as important to be prepared and know what you would do in a hotel/motel emergency as it is in your own home.

Be Safe When Traveling!

  • Choose a hotel/motel that is protected by both smoke alarms and a fire sprinkler system.
  • When you check in, ask the front desk what the fire alarm sounds like.
  • When you enter your room, review the escape plan posted in your room.
  • Take the time to find the exits and count the number of doors between your room and the exit.
  • Keep your room key by your bed and take it with you if there is a fire. 
  • If the alarm sounds, leave right away, closing all doors behind you. Use the stairs-never use elevators during a fire.
  • If you must escape through smoke, get low and go under the smoke to your exit.

Thanksgiving Safety

11/6/2017 (Permalink)

Fire Damage Thanksgiving Safety Happy Thanksgiving from our family to yours.

The kitchen is the heart of the home, especially at Thanksgiving. Safety in the kitchen is important, especially on Thanksgiving Day when there is a lot of activity and people at home.

  • Stay in the kitchen when you are cooking on the stove top so you can keep an eye on the food.
  • Stay in the home when cooking your turkey and check on it frequently.
  • Keep children away from the stove. The stove will be hot and kids should stay 3 feet away.
  • Make sure kids stay away from hot food and liquids. The steam or splash from vegetable, gravy or coffee could cause serious burns.
  • Keep the floor clear so you don't trip over kids, toys, pocketbooks or bags.
  • Keep knives out of reach of children.
  • Be sure electric cords from an electric knife, coffee maker, plate warmer or mixer are not dangling off the counter within easy reach of a child. 
  • Keep matches and utility lighter out of reach of the children.
  • Never leave children alone in a room with a lit candle. 
  • Make sure your smoke alarms are working. Test them by pushing the test button. 
  • Have activities that keep kids out of the kitchen during this busy time. Kids can get involved in Thanksgiving preparations with recipes that can be done outside the kitchen. 

Smoke Alarms at Home

10/24/2017 (Permalink)

Smoke alarms are a key part of a home fire escape plan. When there is fire, smoke spreads fast. Working smoke alarms give you early warning so you can get outside quickly.

Safety Tips

  • Install smoke alarms in every bedroom. They should also be outside each sleeping area and on every level of the home. Install alarms in the basement. 
  • Large homes may need extra smoke alarms.
  • It is best to use interconnected smoke alarms. When one alarm sounds, they all sound.
  • Test all smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working. 
  • There are two kinds of alarms. Ionization smoke alarms are quicker to warn about flaming fires. Photoelectric alarms are quicker to warn about smoldering fires. It is best to use both types of alarms in the home.
  • A smoke alarm should be on the ceiling or high on a wall. Keep smoke alarms away from the kitchen to reduce false alarms. They should be at least 10 feet from the stove.
  • People who are hard of hearing or deaf can use special alarms. These alarms have strobe lights and bed shakers.
  • Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old.

Be Safe On Halloween

10/12/2017 (Permalink)

Community Be Safe On Halloween Happy Halloween!

            Halloween Fire Safety Tips

  • When choosing a costume, stay away from long trailing fabric. If your child is wearing a mask, make sure the eye holes are large enough so he or she can see out.
  • Provide children with flashlights to carry for lighting or glow sticks as part of their costume. 
  • Dried flowers, cornstalks and crepe paper catch fire easily. Keep all decorations away from open flames and other heat sources like light bulbs and heaters. 
  • Use a battery-operated candle or glow-stick in jack-o-lanterns. If you use a real candle, use extreme caution. Make sure children are watched at all times when candles are lit. When lighting candles inside jack-o-lanterns, use long, fireplace-style matches or a utility lighter. Be sure to place lit pumpkins well away from anything that can burn and far enough out of the way of trick-or-treaters, doorsteps, walkways and yards.
  • Remember to keep exits clear of decorations, so nothing blocks escape routes. 
  • Make sure all smoke alarms in the home are working. 
  • Tell children to stay away from open flames including jack-o-lanterns with candles in them. Be sure they know how to stop, drop and roll if their clothing catches fire. (Have them practice, stopping immediately, dropping to the ground, covering their face with hands, and rolling over and over to put the flames out.)

Hurricane Readiness

9/13/2017 (Permalink)

Preparing for a Hurricane:

• Prepare your evacuation plan, including pets, transportation routes and destinations.

• Keep all trees and shrubs well trimmed and clear loose and clogged rain gutters and downspouts.

• Determine how and where to secure your boat.

• Consider building a safe room.

• Stay informed! Listen to a NOAA weather radio or check local forecasts and news reports regularly.

• Cover your home’s windows with pre-cut plywood or hurricane shutters. Tape does not prevent windows from breaking.

• Bring in all outside furniture, decorations, garbage cans, etc.

• Turn off utilities if instructed to do so.

• Turn off propane tanks.

• Avoid using the phone, except for serious emergencies.

• Fill the bathtub or buckets with water to use for cleaning and flushing toilets.

• Keep your gas tank at least 3/4 full at all times.

• Keep your emergency supplies kit, including water, and copies of important documents, in a waterproof, portable container, in an easily accessible location

Evacuate under the following conditions:

• If local authorities tell you to evacuate, follow their directions.

• If you live in a mobile home or temporary structure, which are particularly hazardous no matter how well fastened to the ground.

• If you live in a high-rise building.

• If you live on the coast, on a floodplain, near a river, or on an inland waterway.

• If you feel you are in danger.

• If you live in an area below sea level.

Safety during Winter Storms

9/13/2017 (Permalink)

Winter storms can happen almost anywhere. They can cause us problems. Know what to do before, during and after a storm. This will help keep you and your family safe from a winter fire.

  • Test all smoke alarms. Do this at least once a month. This way you will know they are working. Install carbon monoxide alarms in your home. Test the alarms.
  • Plan two ways out of the home in case of an emergency. Clear driveway and front walk of ice and snow. This will provide easy access to your home.
  • Make sure your house number can be seen from the street. If you need help, firefighters will be able to find you.
  • Be ready in case the power goes out. Have flashlights on hand. Also have battery-powered lighting and fresh batteries. Never use candles.
  • Stay aware of winter weather. Listen to the television or radio for updates. Watch for bulletins online.
  • Check on neighbors. Check on others who may need help.
  • Generators should be used outdoors. Keep them away from windows and doors. Do not run a generator inside your garage, even if the door is open.
  • Stay away from downed wires. Report any downed wires to authorities.
  • Be ready if the heat stops working. Use extra layers of clothes and blankets to stay warm. If you use an emergency heat source, keep anything that can burn at least 3 feet away.
  • Turn portable heaters off when you leave the room. Turn them off when you go to bed.